2017 TLG Case Studies



Adams County, CO

Not Your Daddy’s Workforce Training Program: Rethinking Organizational Training & Development

Population: 450,000

The chairs all aligned, neat in a row … the instructor all ready, her hair in a bow. The employees all nodding, snug in their chairs … while visions of their weekend danced in their heads …

When was your last training at work? Did you warm the seat, but not remember a thing from the class a week later? Were the classes offered Management 101, Legally Bored to Tears, Policy Ad Nausea? Were you asleep before you even started? We were too and unfortunately this is how most government organizations still approach organizational learning! Standardized, drab, safe … sleepy.

What most organizations and employees want (and need) is a constant dynamic of exploring, learning, evolving and growing. While required training is a necessary thing, it’s not the only thing. We set out to kick aside the neat rows of metal chairs and the wooden desks, tossed out the stunningly boring lectures and overhauled our organization’s training environment. We asked ourselves what if we empowered our employees to share their knowledge, have fun, and make a difference? What if we shared that same model with our libraries, our schools and our other neighboring jurisdictions? Come with us and learn how you can begin to overhaul your traditional workforce training program.

Takeaways:

  • Data to ask for and look at – what are your employees really telling you
  • Five things to implement now that are new and no/low cost
  • Experiencing and replicating life hack sessions

View the Case Study  

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Arlington County, VA

Acting Up Not Out: Teens Making a Difference in Arlington

Population: 220,400

Are there teens in your community who feel under-appreciated? Do you want to empower them? Help them feel valued while they learn lifelong skills? In this thought-provoking session, you will learn how Arlington County Virginia turned around the way teens viewed themselves and the positive results of these programs for both teens and the larger community.

Based on community data and benchmarking, Arlington’s Office for Teens created a series of innovative programs that combine job skills training, leadership skill development, and volunteering to empower teens to make a positive impact in their community. Through these programs Arlington is helping to shape tomorrow’s leaders and develop the next generation of entrepreneurs. As a participant, teens develop skills to be assets to their families, communities and employers while becoming talented, positive and caring individuals in their own right. Statistically significant improvements happened in Arlington, and they can happen for you too.

Session take a-ways:

  • Learn unique ways to empower teens and be positive contributors in their communities.
  • Develop teen entrepreneurial programs that pay for themselves.
  • Learn how to prepare teens to become future leaders in their community.

View the Case Study 

View the Presentation


Cities of Arvada and Fort Collins, CO

A Picture is Worth a 1000 Words - Leveraging GIS to Engage, Educate, and Execute

Populations: 111,707 and 152,061

The Cities of Arvada and Fort Collins, Colorado both utilize Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to help visualize unique solutions to complex problems.

Arvada looks at sales and use tax not as numbers on a page, but rather areas of influence on a map. See how visualizing revenue in combination with development projects, traffic studies, Capital Improvement Projects, and police activity can help shape strategic work plans. And see how the City of Fort Collins merges the art and science of mosquito management with a robust communication plan to provide citizens with the knowledge needed to protect themselves from West Nile virus. The Beat the Buzz campaign addresses various aspects of a technical and emotionally charged topic through transparent decision-making and innovative outreach.

Takeaways:

  1. Learn how integrating revenue source into GIS layers can lead to proactive approaches to community and economic development.
  2. Learn how to turn data into pictures to help tell your story.
  3. A look at how GIS mapping can help gain citizen trust via transparent and timely information sharing.
  4. Examples of interactive education and outreach materials regarding West Nile virus and how to connect with harder to reach audiences.
  5. Learning how to use resources and tools to better equip a community against mosquito-borne illnesses.

View the Arvada Case Study 

View the Fort Collins Case Study

View the Presentation


City of Aspen, CO

Parking and Outreach, the Unsolved Mystery

Population: 6,800

In this session you’ll have fun talking about a very passionate subject in most cities, parking. Learn how the city of Aspen, Colorado that has a major parking problem experimented this summer with some creative ideas on how to free up 10% of its parking spaces. Also hear about lessons learned during the experiment. What went well and what went wrong.

We will also talk about the importance of outreach, setting clear goals, having a specific understanding of what success looks like with clear metrics and creative ways to communicate with your City Council. We’ll share what we learned about the importance of a multipronged approach to solving problems.

Takeaways:

  • Understand the importance of outreach to stakeholders before you make any major changes in your city.
  • Learn some tricks on how to communicate new, creative ideas to your City Council.
  • Understand the importance of metrics for the success of any key project.

Supporting Documents:

View the Case Study


Athens-Clarke County Unified Government, GA

Ignite the Wellness Program Flame: Grassroots Spark to Dynamically Burning Success

Population: 121,000

The Unified Government of Athens-Clarke County (ACCUG) will tour you through their 13-year journey of creating, developing, and innovating an employee wellness culture. This self-funded local government of 2,200 employees/retirees sparked the health-minded interest of its employee/retiree population with a basic grassroots program, fanned the flame through comprehensive program planning, and developed a dynamically thriving culture of wellness. Long-term success focus for ACCUG has been on longevity of healthy behaviors, progression from basic health understanding & habits to dynamic healthy lifestyles, and transformation of individual goals from effort-based to actual production of healthy results.

Learn how to determine priority health areas to attack, how to assess & plan around all barriers that apply to your population's ability to improve, how to unify appropriate staff & management support, how to recruit appropriate & effective no- and low-cost community contributors, resources & partnerships, how to achieve buy-in from your population, as well as, how to continually progress each individual program, and the wellness culture overall. ACCUG Wellness Coordinator and Human Resources Director will walk participants through two interactive activities: a program development activity that achieves employee self efficacy and comprehensive health improvement, and a goal-setting activity that is an example of ACCUG's continual progressive plan to move employees from effort-based reward to health results-based reward.

Takeaways:

  • How to ignite a culture of wellness!
  • How to fan the flame through customized, effective programming!
  • How to constantly innovate & keep employees/retirees BURNing with desire to be well and achieve more:
    • B-Assess & plan around BARRIERS
    • U-UNIFY effective staff, contributors, & upper level support
    • R-RECRUIT community RESOURCES & partnerships (no- and low-cost contributors)
    • N-NEVER stop progressing

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View the Presentation

View Resources

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City of Boise, ID

Energize Our Neighborhoods – Community Development Outside the Box

Population: 214,237

Energize Our Neighborhoods is a collaboration between Boise’s residents, public and private partners, and the City to keep our neighborhoods unique and desirable. It focuses on aligning community resources to improve livability and make measurable change for all residents and businesses.

Participants will learn data-driven strategies and methods used to invite inclusive participation, increase economic activity, improve safety, and provide additional services to create more vibrant and connected neighborhoods.

Takeaways:

  • Advantages of data-based community development strategies
  • Achieving community engagement through empowerment
  • Strategic resource alignment and coalition building

View the Case Study

View the Presentation


City of Boston, MA

Government Can Be Beautiful: How Boston put its residents at the heart of its website redesign

Population: 650,000

When we talked to Boston residents about city government and how they felt about our website, their feedback was summed up best by one comment: “Government isn’t broken, but it sure feels that way.” Our antiquated, jargon-heavy website had become an embodiment of the skepticism and disappointment many people feel when interacting with government. So we set out to change that.

In January 2016, we launched a pilot website based on extensive feedback from the community. We used the pilot as a testing grounds for new ideas, pushing new improvements and adding new content every few weeks. Just seven months later, we launched a fully redesigned Boston.gov. Since then, we've made hundreds of continual improvements based on user feedback, and have open sourced the code to invite members of the developer community to contribute directly. In this session, we'll talk about the process, what worked and didn't work, and take you through some of the ideation practices we used along the way.

Takeaways:

  • Get a behind the scenes look at what worked and didn't work during the user centered redesign of Boston.gov
  • Participate in an ideation session that will bring insights and provide you a playbook you can reuse for your own projects
  • Learn how one city has successfully implemented agile methods to improve digital services for government

View the Case Study


City of Boulder, CO

Make, Play, Connect: Repeat

Population: 104,000

BLDG 61: Boulder Library Makerspace will host an interactive session all about making creative connections for innovative community spaces. We will be creating an Innovation Utility Map with all participants. 

The goal is to facilitate a conversation about the serendipitous connections we can make through tinkering and play, and how this can inform how we connect on a larger scale with organizations in our communities and beyond. How can we network innovative efforts and ideas globally? What might this look like? How can we document our collective efforts? How can we share dynamically? The purpose is to activate collaboration and innovation through a maker activity, and recognize that this process should not be insular. We have so much to gain from open sourcing our ideas. The activity will serve as a metaphor for the larger conversation of connecting innovation across communities and inspire creative thinking about outreach and partnerships. We will discuss our successes at BLDG 61 helping homeless develop woodworking skills to reenter the workforce, working with under-served youth through intensive apprenticeship programs, and serving as a launchpad for entrepreneurs and innovators in our community to spark business and industry.

Takeaways:

  • Get hands-on with a maker activity
  • Discover how inviting the community to design/play/build can transform lives
  • Learn how to take calculated risks through effective partnerships and tap into the strengths existing within your community (and beyond)

Other Supporting Materials:

View the Case Study


City and County of Denver, CO

Waiting in Line is Fun - Said No One Ever

Population: 650,000

Denver’s Mayor made Customer Service one of his top priorities when he took office in 2011 because one of the biggest customer complaints was how long it took to do business with the City. Three agencies examined wait times and customer service satisfaction.

  • Motor Vehicle wait times braked from 1.3 hours to 20 minutes.
  • Excise and License wait times dropped from 3 hours to 15 minutes.
  • There’s no time for your feet to get cold – the once, 45-minute wait to get your marriage license from the Clerk & Recorder is now less than 38 seconds.

Government agencies are monopolies; we are the only provider of our goods and services. The lack of competition has led to the perception of tangled bureaucracy and government workers who don’t care about the customer. And perception is reality.
Our customers’ perception now is that they are our priority every day. Now, we hear how quick and easy doing business with us is and how we exceed the customer’s expectations. Heck, we even get Yelp awards because people love us. How many Departments of motor Vehicles can make that claim?!

Takeaways:

  • We had to find the root of the problem. Why did we have such extensive wait times?
  • Our staff helped create solutions to the problems. This gave them ownership and empowered them.
  • Technology helps but can’t solve everything.
  • Helping customers do business when they need to do business helped in satisfaction.
  • Standardization of work makes us more nimble.

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View the Presentation


City of Durham and County of Durham, NC

Collaborative Innovation: How the City and County of Durham, N.C. Partner to Build Innovation Capacity Through Skills Workshops

Populations: 228,330 and 276,587

"The whole is greater than the sum of its parts." – Aristotle

As two organizations serving largely the same residents, two years ago City and County staff conceived IdeaLab as a regular forum and place for both organizations to coalesce around a shared vision to generate ideas and build innovation capacity. Every other month, employees from a wide variety of City and County departments gather – often in funky, startup-style meeting spaces off-site – to learn about an innovation concept and to then practice that concept with a hands-on activity. Since its creation, IdeaLab has evolved into a workshop-style forum where employees are exposed to a variety of innovative concepts and skills such as behavioral economics, human-centered design and prototyping. The City and County of Durham are committed to fostering a culture of innovation, one IdeaLab session at a time.

Takeaways:

  • Convening change-oriented employees and providing them with the tools, time and space to be innovative can help spark a culture of innovation.
  • Collaborating with other communities and community stakeholders can add value and longevity to an innovation initiative.
  • Facilitating hands-on activities help keep an audience engaged and allow for direct application of the taught concept.
  • Exposing participants to as many different innovative concepts, skills and approaches as possible can fill up their innovation “toolbox.”

View the Case Study

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City of Decatur, GA

Leadership Development for Employees by Employees – A guide to creating an employee leadership course starting with a box of blonde wigs

Population: 21,000

Well, it really started with the 2014 Innovation Academy, followed by a box of wigs, a music video, and then the creation of an internal leadership development program. The City of Decatur Innovation Academy team decided to create a program that engaged and motivated employees to lead growth and change in the organization. In 2015, the first E5 Academy started with participants taking part unique team building activities, learning leadership techniques, and building strong interdepartmental relationships.

This session is for anyone looking to create an internal leadership training program or for anyone looking to breathe new life into their organization by getting employees to think outside the box. You’ll hear from members of the original Innovation Academy team and graduates of the first E5 Academy class, and experience some of the E5 activities first hand.

Takeaways:

  • How to determine if an internal leadership program is right for your organization.
  • Creating a motivated team to take on the task of developing a program.
  • Developing a program that breeds innovation and becomes sustainable.

View the Case Study


City of Decatur, GA

Going Beyond Kumbaya: A Proactive Approach to Embracing Equity, Inclusion and Engagement

Population: 21,000

What is government’s role in creating a space for community dialogue across differences? How do you bring everyone to the table, especially those who have not traditionally felt welcomed or included? Why should you spend time and money on a civic engagement process to create a plan designed to result in a more just, welcoming, equitable, inclusive and compassionate community?

This presentation addresses these questions and more in a dynamic, interactive dialogue with Decatur, GA officials and residents who created and are currently implementing the Better Together Community Action Plan for Equity, Inclusion and Engagement and taking a proactive approach to addressing conversations across differences.

Takeaways:

  • Successes and pitfalls associated with a proactive approach to creating a Community Action Plan for Equity, Inclusion and Engagement.
  • Communication tactics with an eye toward equity and targeted outreach to bring a more representative array of voices to the “table.” 
  • A Better Together Community Conversation Tool Kit.
  • The value of a community asset map and how to create one.

View the Case Study


City of Flagstaff, AZ

Welcome to the ‘Virtual Kitchen Table: How Technology is Making Public Engagement More Inclusive

Population: 70,320

American contemporary author E.A. Bucchianeri contends that “there are times when wisdom cannot be found in the chambers of parliament or the halls of academia but at the unpretentious setting of the kitchen table.” Indeed, local governments are constantly striving to meet constituents where they are, while also conducting public discourse in an open, transparent way. In the digital age, this balance has become even more critical to engaging stakeholders and earning their trust.

Online technology has afforded a solution—essentially creating a ‘virtual kitchen table’ where everyone can pull up a chair regardless of their schedules or comfort with public speaking. The City of Flagstaff, AZ, recently exemplified what is possible with online civic engagement, when it launched a dedicated online portal in 2015. The city was able to create a digital hub rich with thoughtful, productive discussions—many of which included new voices from the community. During this session, attendees will learn what went into making this effort successful, and how it has benefitted city staff, elected officials and the community at large.

Takeaways:

  • Online public engagement can be a shared resource across all agency departments, and getting staff buy-in isn’t as hard as it may seem 
  • You don’t have to separate online and in-person public engagement; you can embrace and integrate both. 
  • Online engagement can facilitate the public collaborating with their local government, and empower them to bring outside perspectives and ideas to the table.

View the Case Study

View the Presentation


City of Fort Collins, CO

One Planet Employee Engagement and Sustainability Program

Population: 150,000

As the City of Fort Collins’ external services grow, our internal workforce is in need of opportunities to learn more about our own programs, specifically how we are achieving sustainability within our operations. One Planet is an internal, employee engagement and sustainability program, designed around field trips, which educates City staff about the services and programs provided for our community.

The One Planet program is a short term, annual program strives to inspire the people in our workforce (the City of Fort Collins) to embrace the three pillars of sustainability and become better employees through hands-on learning opportunities. One Planet fosters interdepartmental collaboration, connections and idea generation. It stretches employees who participate to learn more about their own organization and it stretches the employees giving tours to learn how to showcase their work. The best part of the program is that it is run by employees for employees, allowing internal experts to showcase and describe their work to their co-workers. It also provides leadership opportunities to the Ambassadors (a group of employees dedicated to running the program). It is great to step away from the daily grind of work to see the big picture and how we, as an organization, make a difference in our community through the projects and programs that are on available. There are no other opportunities to learn and grow through hands-on opportunities like One Planet.

Takeaways:

  • Understand why employee engagement is a key part of any public outreach effort.
  • Field trips are not just for schools – using them in the workplace is powerful.
  • You too can start a program like One Planet.

View the Case Study


Manatee County, FL

Remove From Sender: How Manatee County Reduced Its Junk Mail

Population: 353,000

The innovative Junk Mail project is directly tied to Manatee County’s vision for a sustainable community. The goal of eliminating massive volumes of junk/third-party mail coming into the county system came from an online residential survey which addressed recycling and waste disposal services in Manatee County. Community recycling concerns included the continuous cycle of receiving and disposing of junk mail. After assessing the results, the junk mail project officially kicked off in November of 2015 and is currently ongoing. The initial idea behind the project was simple; decrease the amount of incoming mail by eliminating it at the source. The thought was to unsubscribe from all media and marketing agencies, cancel and reduce subscriptions, and join the modernized world of digital communications.

The Energy and Sustainability Coordinator contacted hundreds of marketing and media organization and unsubscribed from thousands of unwanted materials. Over the past year, researching the many external components associated with junk mail became essential for the awareness and accountability of the careless use of natural resources and harmful environmental consequences. Other unfavorable issues anonymously affect the community and local taxpayers by paying the cost of delivery and disposal of unsolicited junk mail. The project continues to be a proactive approach by improving time management, updating county operations, preserving environmental and county resources by considering the triple-bottom-line and the analysis of the entire nexus system.

Takeaways:

  • Sustainable efforts within local governments:
  • Sustainable efforts within Manatee County 
  • Data collection and analysis with integrated technology

View the Case Study 

View the StoryMap


City of Mesa, AZ

Establishing Employee Health Centers and Creating Positive Health Outcomes

Population: 457,587

The City of Mesa has taken a very progressive stance on improving the health of its organization. In 2014, the City of Mesa established its own employee Health and Wellness Center, drastically changing how healthcare is delivered to its employees and family members participating in the City’s health plan. By decreasing the barriers to quality healthcare and developing an integrative approach, the City has created and continues to discover new ways to transform and improve the health of its organization.

In this case study session, participants will learn how an onsite employee health center can ignite many positive changes within an organization, including improved employee health, morale, productivity and retention. Participants will get the opportunity to assess their employer health benefits plan and see how implementing an employee health center can provide a variety of benefits. In addition, the session will address the integrative approach taken by the City of Mesa to employer health and benefits design and the challenges and opportunities that come with this endeavor.

Takeaways:

  • Learn how an onsite employee health center can significantly expand and control how an organization provides health benefits and resources to its employees and dependents 
  • Discover how providing affordable, accessible and quality healthcare creates successes for everyone in an organization
  • Learn how an organization effectively improves the health, and well-being of its 10,000+ employees and dependents with an integrated center model
    • Utilizing an employee health center to deliver wellness services and reduce healthcare costs
  • Examine the organizational benefits, including cost avoidance, employee retention and improved employee health through implementing an onsite employee health center

 View the Case Study

View the Presentation

Health Check Up SOAP Note


City of Novi, MI

Dealing with "Capital" - Developing an innovative digital solution to share a City's Capital Improvement Program

Population: 58,753

Imagine spending countless hours in 6+ software packages developing an "easy to understand" document that eventually produced material to fill multiple 4-inch binders. The result was the City of Novi, Michigan’s Capital Improvement Program (CIP). City staff reached the point where there had to be an efficient alternative and engaged the private sector to partner in developing a technology-driven solution to improve and optimize how the City creates and publishes the CIP document. The end result allows for easy comprehension of the material by elected and appointed officials, along with other community stakeholders.

An interactive and engaging session will guide participants through leads identified by a private partner, Socrata, to think outside of the box and come up with a new platform to present a complex set of data in lieu of settling with printing reams of paper to convey the necessary information. Session participants will see firsthand how a digital solution optimized an obsolete way of conveying information.

Takeaways:

  • Innovative time saving solution
  • Increased community engagement
  • Providing a resource for employees

View the Case Study

View the Session Handout


City of Novi, MI

Hello Novi! Utilizing Community Partnerships to Attract New Residents to Live, Work and Play

Population: 58,753

Every community is looking for new ways to attract new residents to call their municipality home. Novi, Michigan took a new approach by utilizing constantly evolving mapping solutions and leveraging the partnerships with its respective school districts to develop a new tool to say "hello" to potential new citizens. No matter where you are in the world you can take a virtual tour of the City and view videos highlighting important landmarks (schools, parks, shopping districts, etc.) to help you decide this is the right place for you!

The presentation will guide interested attendees through the process of pulling together a content rich website and working with several partners to pull everything together and make it work!

Takeaways:

  • Attract new residents
  • Building partnerships with k-12 colleagues
  • A new way to promote your community

View the Case Study


City of Phoenix, AZ

Mining for Gold: Creating a Circular Economy Hub

Population: 1,500,000

The City of Phoenix is taking a new approach to sustainability by implementing circular economy principals to transform trash into resources. The City is creating economic activity from materials that the City previously spent money to landfill such as mattresses, food waste, and palm fronds while increasing the diversion rate. Additionally, The City is repurposing what was previously considered undesirable land near a transfer station, a materials recovery facility and a closed landfill and now leasing that land to manufacturers who are creating jobs and new products, all from materials previously considered trash.

This interactive case study will help you identify ways your local government can mine for gold in the waste stream to increase the solid waste diversion rate; create jobs; and stimulate the local economy by attracting new businesses, manufacturers and innovators.

Takeaways:

  • Understanding of Circular Economy Principles
  • Real-life Success Stories
  • Tips for Mining Your Own Circular Economy Gold

View the Case Study


City of Phoenix, AZ

Is it really an option for a City to foreclose on its residents?

Population: 1,500,000

Named among the nation’s worst recession ghost towns following the housing crisis, Phoenix was left with a surge of vacant properties throughout the city. For years, Phoenix has overlooked state laws that provide Arizona municipalities the power to foreclose on delinquent blight abatement liens. After all, what city would ever think to foreclose on its residents? Phoenix’ Abatement Lien Program (ALP), utilizes the leverage granted by state law to foreclose on properties it paid to secure and abate blight transforming chronic vacant or abandoned and blighting properties into lived in, tax paying, contributing residential properties, while recovering millions of dollars of unpaid liens.

What problems is your organization facing that should warrant its assumptions to be challenged? What circumstances make a solution, once seen as impractical, politically viable? Phoenix had to change antiquated assumptions that delinquent abatement lien properties were lived in as the economic downturn continued to produce dilapidated and vacant properties that were draining city funds to repeatedly abate their blight. The changing circumstances made it politically acceptable to foreclose on vacant property that is a burden on neighborhoods from a health and safety, nuisance, and property value perspective.

Takeaways:

  • Challenge assumptions and operations.
  • Re-discover available tools at different levels of government that can get the job done.
  • Innovate where there are limited resources.

Get the 'What is Your Roadblock/ Challenge: template, filled #1 & filled #2.

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View the Presentation


City of San Antonio, TX

Collaborative Management of Homelessness: Making an I.M.P.A.C.T. in San Antonio

Population: 1,469,845

Many communities have struggled with the issue of decreasing the population of those that are chronically homeless. Often Police Departments are expected to "arrest away" the problem. However, arresting away the problem does not work - the chronically homeless cycle in and out of the criminal justice system and homelessness; businesses and residents do not see any changes in their neighborhoods; and the chronically homeless do not get the help they need. In the fall of 2015, the City of San Antonio's Office of Innovation collaborated with the City's Police Department, the City's Department of Human Services and local homeless service providers to come up with a collaborative, innovative solution to the problem. The new strategy aimed to balance law enforcement and human service approaches and has led to a number of improvements for the City's homeless population, the people serving them and our community as a whole.

This presentation will provide information on our new strategy which includes multi-disciplinary IMPACT teams (Integrated Mobile Partners Action Care Team), a modernized organizational structure and a streamlined continuum of care system to access services. The presentation will also include hearing directly from the providers of services and those that are benefiting from the services. This has been a truly collaborative effort that has had an immediate impact on San Antonio. Within the first six month, the IMPACT teams have documented over 579 contacts with homeless individuals since the start of the program, resulting in a 33% referral rate. Data shows that homeless individuals are now more willing to accept assistance and refusal of services has reduced from 57% at the start of the program to 38%.

Takeaways:

  • Solving major community issues requires a collaborative effort between government entities and service providers. It can require strategies that stretch limits typically associated with government on a number of levels, including redefining the role we play in our community.
  • The strategy that San Antonio followed is replicable in other communities and that replication has already occurred. 
  • For issues such as homelessness, balancing law enforcement and human service approaches are key to an effective strategy.

View the Case Study

View the Presentation

Ending Veteran Homelessness Booklet


City of Tulsa, OK

Teens, Transit and Technology: Moving the Next Generation Forward

Population: 403,505

Tulsa is known for its wide range of services for at-risk populations. A particular emphasis has been on services for teens through organizations like Youth Services of Tulsa and the Campaign to End Teen Pregnancy. Throughout the years, these agencies have struggled to engage teens consistently due to a lack of transportation options. Typically teens must arrange their own transportation after school to attend physical and mental health related appointments. Over the past year a team of social entrepreneurs came together as part of the Mine Fellowship to solve this problem.

The solution was a combination of a volunteer-based transit system, called ModusSelect and a training called ModusEd that sought to train teens on ways to use existing transit. In the meantime, Tulsa Transit and Tulsa Public Schools were working on a partnership to allow high school students to ride transit for free using their ID. A small team of Code for Tulsa developers set out to develop a simple interface called TPSRides that allows students to get transit directions to school on their smartphones. We will discuss the partnership between Tulsa Public Schools and Tulsa Transit as well as the benefits of helping teens use transit. Today over 2,000 trips per week are being taken on Tulsa Transit.

Session Take-aways:

  • Partnership between schools and transit can lead to reduced absenteeism
  • Small scale technology developed in a matter of hours can make an impact
  • Unlike the generation before, teens today embrace transit and the freedom it provides

 View the Case Study

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